Contemporary Society – Tahaoglu http://tahaoglu.net/ Sun, 12 Sep 2021 04:11:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://tahaoglu.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-150x150.png Contemporary Society – Tahaoglu http://tahaoglu.net/ 32 32 Top TV and Streaming Picks for the Week to Come http://tahaoglu.net/top-tv-and-streaming-picks-for-the-week-to-come/ Sun, 12 Sep 2021 04:11:32 +0000 http://tahaoglu.net/top-tv-and-streaming-picks-for-the-week-to-come/ DO NOT MISS : “The Morning Show” – Jennifer Aniston, Reese Witherspoon and Steve Carell return to the addictive drama series on a very troubled morning news show. The second season picks up after the explosive events of the Season 1 finale, in which anchors Alex (Aniston) and Bradley (Witherspoon) were broadcast live to expose […]]]>

DO NOT MISS : “The Morning Show” – Jennifer Aniston, Reese Witherspoon and Steve Carell return to the addictive drama series on a very troubled morning news show. The second season picks up after the explosive events of the Season 1 finale, in which anchors Alex (Aniston) and Bradley (Witherspoon) were broadcast live to expose the rampant sexual misconduct of their UBA network. Now, the “Morning Show” crew are emerging from the wreckage and dealing with the fallout. Newcomers to the series include Julianna Margulies, Greta Lee, Holland Taylor, and Hasan Minhaj. (Friday, Apple TV +).

Other bets

SUNDAY: Justin Bieber, who leads all arrivals with seven nominations, is set to perform at the MTV Video Music Awards for the first time since 2015. Other artists who will take the stage at Brooklyn’s Barclays Center include Camila Cabello , Lil Nas X, Lorde, Machine Gun Kelly, Doja Cat, Shawn Mendes and more. (8 p.m., MTV).

SUNDAY: “Scenes from a Wedding” is a modern five-part adaptation of Ingmar Bergman’s classic 1973 miniseries about a troubled marriage. Starring Jessica Chastain and Oscar Isaac, the update explores love, hate, desire, monogamy, marriage and divorce through the prism of a contemporary American couple. (9 p.m., HBO).

SUNDAY: In the drama series “American Rust”, Jeff Daniels plays a small town police chief who must decide how far he is willing to go to protect the adult son of the woman he loves (Maura Tierney) when the son becomes linked to murder. The series is based on a novel by Philipp Meyer. (10 p.m., show time).

This image posted by Showtime shows Jeff Daniels as Del Harris, left, and Rob Yang as Steve Park, in a scene from “American Rust,” which premiered on September 12. (Dennis Mong / Showtime via AP)

MONDAY: Still haven’t had your fill of post-apocalyptic drama? Based on a DC Comics series, “Y: The Last Man” is set in a world where all mammals with a Y chromosome have been killed by a mysterious plague, except for one guy and his pet monkey. . Now the survivors must figure out how to rebuild a functioning society. (FX on Hulu).

TUESDAY: Everything is on the line tonight as the finalists for “America’s Got Talent” deliver their crucial final performances in the hope of winning our votes. The winner will be announced at the end of Wednesday’s season finale. (8 p.m., NBC).

THURSDAY: We expect plenty of laughs – and maybe a few tears – as Jake Peralta and the “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” gang finish their run. In the hour-long series finale – titled “The Last Day” – the team takes stock of their eight years together and looks to the future. (8 p.m., NBC).

SATURDAY: Get out a good bottle of zin for the TV movie “Raise a Glass to Love”. An aspiring master sommelier (Laura Osnes) returns to her family vineyard to study and is intrigued by the natural methods of the handsome new Argentine winemaker (Juan Pablo Di Pace). I wonder where all this will lead? (9 p.m., Hallmark Channel).

– Tribune press service


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Who are our future cultural leaders? http://tahaoglu.net/who-are-our-future-cultural-leaders/ Thu, 09 Sep 2021 05:01:57 +0000 http://tahaoglu.net/who-are-our-future-cultural-leaders/ As applications for the Master of Fine Arts in Cultural Leadership are closed, course leader Karlyn Brown talks about the future of Australia’s cultural leaders. Above: Creative Meet Up – Networking night in the town of Ryde. (Photo: James Schulz for the city of Ryde) What are the critical issues for leaders in the current […]]]>

As applications for the Master of Fine Arts in Cultural Leadership are closed, course leader Karlyn Brown talks about the future of Australia’s cultural leaders.

Above: Creative Meet Up – Networking night in the town of Ryde. (Photo: James Schulz for the city of Ryde)

What are the critical issues for leaders in the current cultural context?

The diversity of our cultural context is a dynamic and ever-changing reflection of who we are, the multiplicity of our voices and the creative expressions that express what is important to us as individuals, communities and societies.

In a rapidly disrupted world, we must not only embrace change, but also stimulate the influence and impact that arts and culture can have in solving critical problems.

Some of the pressing issues that require transformational modeling include:

  • Engage with First Nations cultural knowledge and practices, and create avenues for Indigenous-led platforms;
  • Address the climate crisis and implement radical changes and long-term sustainability in our practices;
  • Strengthen the diversity and intersectionality of creative voices and fundamentally shift to fully inclusive organizational and creative practices;
  • Support the independent sector – the cornerstone of the arts, practices and programs to support independent artists and creators;
  • Navigate the devastating impact of the COVID pandemic and create resilience and sustainability through innovation and changed practices; and
  • Implement more caring, safer and healthier work practices in the arts and culture sector.

What prompts people to take the NIDA MFA in Cultural Leadership course?

The course is designed specifically for those who already have active roles in the arts and culture sector. It provides an inclusive, safe and dynamic learning environment for those who aspire to facilitate new and resilient leadership models in their practice.

The course advocates for the development of cross-sectoral cohorts bringing together people with diverse practices and backgrounds, including performing arts, museums, galleries, libraries, local governments, festivals, independent arts practices and cultural organizations and community.

Students are supported to exchange and collaborate in innovative and entrepreneurial approaches to creative and professional practice, and to engage in thought leadership and interdisciplinary practices.

The interdisciplinary nature of each cohort, combined with peer learning opportunities, allows students to consolidate their skills, knowledge and expertise to lead with confidence in a wide range of disciplines and industry roles.

What learning and new knowledge are people looking for in the course?

The course was created in 2016 as an indispensable platform to inspire innovative leadership in the arts and culture sector – an academic course that builds on connections and synergies between disciplines and develops values ​​of leadership around inclusiveness, collaboration, shared knowledge and ambitious thinking. .

We challenge current methodologies and highlight various approaches and opportunities around leadership in governance, cultural policy and practice, entrepreneurial modeling, communication, advocacy, cultural transformation and sustainability, and research generated by practice, as well as international leadership models.

Under the direction of First Nations speaker Jacob Boehme, we are developing a strategy to engage with First Nations knowledge and knowledge systems during and around the 30 month course of study for each student.

The course supports the development of leadership skills and experience to be able to address contemporary issues and challenges essential to the vitality and relevance of the cultural sector. It encourages collaborative, entrepreneurial and advocacy approaches to find and communicate solutions.

What other experiences does the course offer students?

Students and alumni consistently cite the deep connections, collegiality, and shared knowledge and experiences that exist within cohorts, creating relationships and networks that continue beyond the course.

Comments on other experiences include:

  • Valorize the caliber of teaching provided by highly experienced cultural leaders in the arts industry and senior academics at NIDA, as well as unprecedented access to exceptional cultural leaders as speakers, panelists and reviewers.
  • Be able to engage in content, readings and discussions that take them beyond their practice bubble, into new territories of leadership practices and methodologies
  • Develop a deeper understanding of interdependencies between sectors and opportunities for knowledge exchange.
  • Reflect on leadership values ​​and responsibilities, become empowered to take on a leadership role, and share ways to effect change.

Do you feel inspired? Applications to study in 2022 close on September 30, 2022. More information about the course is here.


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Austin.com Austin International Art Fair – BIG WEEKEND OPENING FAIR http://tahaoglu.net/austin-com-austin-international-art-fair-big-weekend-opening-fair/ Sat, 04 Sep 2021 20:09:06 +0000 http://tahaoglu.net/austin-com-austin-international-art-fair-big-weekend-opening-fair/ West Chelsea Contemporary presents Austin International Art Fair: 3-day opening festival + immersive exhibit this Labor Day weekend. AUSTIN, Texas – West Chelsea Contemporary is delighted to present its latest exhibition, The Austin International Art Fair (AIAF), a 7-week full-scale immersive exhibition showcasing rare works from an impressive list of international masters of art. Open […]]]>

West Chelsea Contemporary presents Austin International Art Fair: 3-day opening festival + immersive exhibit this Labor Day weekend.

AUSTIN, Texas – West Chelsea Contemporary is delighted to present its latest exhibition, The Austin International Art Fair (AIAF), a 7-week full-scale immersive exhibition showcasing rare works from an impressive list of international masters of art.

Open to the public on Saturday September 4 and until Sunday October 24, this new show presents works from more than fifteen countries and thirty-two artists. The exhibition includes the father of surrealism Salvador Dalí with an exceptional selection from the Argillet collection.

Other featured artists include: Australian neo-surrealist artist Gil Bruvel, Gary James McQueen, contemporary Chinese artists Zhang Xiao Gang, Yue Min Jun and Zao Wu Ki, as well as Japanese neo-pop artists Takashi Murakami and Yoshitomo Nara.

Synonymous with surrealism, the work of French surrealist Salvador Dalí both shocked viewers with his exploration of the psyche and paved the way for future artists. Continuing this tradition, the French neo-surrealist of Australian origin Gil Bruvel works across multiple disciplines and media. Also Australian, photographer Vee Speers captures a surreal dystopia while investigating our youth-obsessed society. Cultural movements within a collectivist society are explored through contemporary Chinese art. Artists such as Zhang Xiaogang and Yue Minjun question the status of the individual while Liu Bolin paints himself in places of historical discord. Neo-pop masters Takashi Murakami and Yoshitomo Nara embrace manga lore and the Superflat movement.


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TECNO launches new brand slogan Stop At Nothing in India | Taiwan News http://tahaoglu.net/tecno-launches-new-brand-slogan-stop-at-nothing-in-india-taiwan-news/ Thu, 02 Sep 2021 07:40:00 +0000 http://tahaoglu.net/tecno-launches-new-brand-slogan-stop-at-nothing-in-india-taiwan-news/ TECNO pays homage to the human pursuit of purpose and potential NEW DELHI, INDIA – African Media Agency – September 2, 2021 – Global premium smartphone brand TECNO today launched its new brand slogan Stop At Nothing, while launching a #StopAtNothing hashtag brand campaign that pays tribute to those who continue to fight against all […]]]>

TECNO pays homage to the human pursuit of purpose and potential

NEW DELHI, INDIA – African Media Agency – September 2, 2021 – Global premium smartphone brand TECNO today launched its new brand slogan Stop At Nothing, while launching a #StopAtNothing hashtag brand campaign that pays tribute to those who continue to fight against all odds. #StopAtNothing represents TECNO’s recognition of human progress and the pursuit of goals, potential and excellence.

With a new brand slogan, TECNO is indeed unstoppable: TECNO has experienced 210% year-on-year growth in the Indian market, reaching 11 million units sold since its local launch in April 2017. (Source: Counterpoint Q2 2021 report)

#StopAtNothing is TECNO’s next step in delivering on its promise to unlock the best of contemporary smartphone technology and make it accessible to global emerging markets.

The TECNO brand campaign celebrates “progressive mavericks” and “young at heart”, young people who have stood up admirably in the face of adversity.

“We have seen how a resilient and progressive society can be in the face of adversity, especially among young adults in emerging markets. It doesn’t matter where you come from, what you look like physically or what gender you belong to, people “will stop at nothing” to progress and find creative and disruptive ways to reach their potential. In return, they find themselves on a joyful and exciting journey, “explains Danni Xu, TECNO Marketing Director. “And this attitude and spirit resonates so strongly at TECNO that we have been forced to embrace it and position it at the very heart of who we are and what we do as a technology brand.”

The campaign, which will roll out worldwide, includes several above the line elements, including a 60-second global brand video created to demonstrate the resilience of the human spirit. It will be supported by strategic execution of digital, social and other marketing tactics from representative markets such as Nigeria, Kenya, India, Turkey, Philippines and Russia.

#StopAtNothing is more of another brand campaign, ”says Xu. “It represents the values ​​and attitude we take as a brand and TECNO’s role in delivering the technology they need to get even further ahead.

“#StopAtNothing not only inspires, but also reinforces TECNO’s total commitment to supporting our consumers with innovative and stylish technology solutions that drive progression,” adds Xu.

TECNO’s goal is to become the world’s most admired technology brand and to continually make breakthroughs in product and experience innovations.

According to a recent Counterpoint study report in the second quarter, the Transsion group brands (itel, Infinix and TECNO) saw 296% year-on-year growth, capturing a 7% share collectively in the second quarter of 2021. in the overall smartphone market in India.

“Our success in the Indian market so far is due to our ‘glocal approach’ which is based on our philosophy ‘Think globally, act locally. We have the foresight to anticipate market needs, embrace change and adapt our products to our customers’ model behaviors, ”concludes Xu.

Earlier this year, TECNO announced its latest “superpower” – to make Chris Evans, a leading Hollywood celebrity, its global brand ambassador. This signing reinforced TECNO’s determination to be recognized as a leader in global emerging markets.

As the brand continues to grow on the global stage, TECNO now finds itself competing with the big mainstream brands, who will no doubt sit back and take note of TECNO’s “super-heroic” maneuver.

Assets

About TECNO

TECNO is a premium brand of smartphones and AIoT devices from TRANSSION Holdings. With “Stop At Nothing” as the essence of the brand, TECNO is committed to unlocking the best contemporary technologies for progressive individuals in global emerging markets, offering them smart products with elegant designs that inspire consumers to experience a world of possibilities. TECNO understands the needs of consumers in different markets and provides them with localized innovations and design breakthroughs demonstrated by their mastery of serving consumers “young at heart” who continually strive for excellence. TECNO’s portfolio includes smartphones, tablets, smart wearable devices and AIoT devices designed for consumers in more than 70 emerging markets around the world. TECNO is also the official partner of Manchester City, Premier League champions 2020-21. For more information, please visit: Social media iconwww.tecno-mobile.com.

#TECNO #StopAtNothing


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Architecture heats up with the greenhouse effect http://tahaoglu.net/architecture-heats-up-with-the-greenhouse-effect/ Sun, 29 Aug 2021 04:01:51 +0000 http://tahaoglu.net/architecture-heats-up-with-the-greenhouse-effect/ You might think of a greenhouse as an outhouse, a small structure in a garden for growing plants under glass. It could be considered as a place of agriculture on an industrial scale, enveloping an artificial landscape. You might think of it as the genesis of modernity, the ground zero of contemporary architecture – a […]]]>

You might think of a greenhouse as an outhouse, a small structure in a garden for growing plants under glass. It could be considered as a place of agriculture on an industrial scale, enveloping an artificial landscape.

You might think of it as the genesis of modernity, the ground zero of contemporary architecture – a legacy that began with the Palm House in Kew Gardens and the Crystal Palace in Hyde Park in the mid-19th century and has continued to encompass the great stations and halls, before shaping the shopping centers, leisure centers, holiday parks, airports and museums which became the architectural expressions of late capitalism.

Or it could just bring hints of global warming, climate catastrophe, greenhouse effect.

Whatever you think, the greenhouse is making a comeback in architecture in the most unexpected way. They appear everywhere, from the work of this year’s Pritzker Prize winners Lacaton & Vassal to the encapsulation by Carmody Groarke of Charles Rennie Mackintosh’s Hill House. From Moscow to Mars, they become the default signifier of our brand of modernity.

Lacaton & Vassal have wrapped French social housing in glass. . . © Philippe Ruault

View from a living room which opens out through glass doors and onto the exterior glass wall of the building

. . . create an area between the interior and the city for the inhabitants © Philippe Ruault

It is a curious phenomenon which seems to recognize the fragility of architecture and our place in the world. There is no more cliché – or better – metaphor for precariousness than the glass house. But its use resists this interpretation, seeking instead a way for the modern era to coexist with older structures, recognizing difference, climate change and cultural change, the nature of mass production, and some futility.

In one of the most influential buildings in recent years, De Vylder Vinck Taillieu’s Caritas Psychiatric Center in Melle, Belgium, the architects inserted seemingly standard greenhouses into the shell of a historic hospital. It can be a commentary on the changing nature of institutions (literally introducing transparency) but it also suggests an attitude towards history, allowing the fabric to remain as a romantic ruin while inhabiting it partially and lightly. The fragility of a greenhouse contrasts with the heavy confidence of the 19th century: it is an illuminated and sheltered place that is uncertain. In the context of a hospital, he asks questions about how we deal with mental illness as a society.

A striped brick building with a pointed roof

De Vylder Vinck Taillieu’s Caritas Psychiatric Center in Melle, Belgium, uses the building envelope. . . © Philippe Dujardin

Free-standing greenhouses are found in the pillared shell of a brick building

. . . and put greenhouses there, introducing transparency and lightly inhabiting a romantic ruin © Filip Dujardin

The tradition is not entirely new. Already in the early 1970s, Swedish architect Bengt Warne wrapped old houses in greenhouses, preserving their fabric while modernizing their appearance and thermal performance. He introduced a zone of nature, a buffer zone between landscape and interior that is not quite one or the other.

Jo Taillieu, who has since formed his own practice, continued exploration in the Paddenbroek educational center in Gooik, Belgium, enveloping the buildings of an abandoned fruit farm in a large greenhouse structure that both plays on the agricultural origins of the site and creates an internal landscape of historic buildings as rooms.

A long, low silver building shines in the sun, flanked by trees
OMA architects wrapped the Garage Museum of Contemporary Art in Moscow in inexpensive translucent polycarbonate © Iwan Baan

OMA Architects had previously wrapped the Garage, a Communist-era canteen in Moscow, in inexpensive translucent polycarbonate, contrasting the fragile layer of the new pearly with the solid and confident modernism of the defunct building to create a striking artistic hub.

French architects Lacaton & Vassal have built their careers on cladding buildings in delicate layers of translucent materials. What is unusual about them is that their attention is not focused on world-class institutions but on social housing. By wrapping the modernist slabs in layers of polycarbonate or glass, they allowed the inhabitants to remain in place during the execution of the work, their communities intact. The new envelope then offers an enlarged exterior, an area between the interior and the city that has itself become a kind of greenhouse, with stacks of gardens in the sky and brightly lit areas that residents can inhabit.

Tall buildings seen from afar in a meadow beyond a river

The FRAC gallery of Lacaton & Vassal in Dunkirk is clad in corrugated polycarbonate. . . © Philippe Ruault

The space between the two glass walls of industrial appearance with a glass roof

. . . which creates a new zone between the two layers of material © Philippe Ruault

They applied the same techniques to the FRAC gallery in Dunkirk in 2019, where they built a greenhouse-shaped structure to mirror the reused and reused industrial hangar next door. The new structure is clad in corrugated polycarbonate, a ghostly echo of the cracked pewter next to it, a translucent shadow. This is a particularly striking effect at night when the industrial hangar darkens and the new building begins to shine like a paper lantern, a play of positive and negative, of weight and ephemeral and, no doubt, of d industry and art.

Last year, architects Carmody Groarke locked Mackintosh’s Hill House in Helensburgh, Scotland, in a steel box clad in chain mail as part of a conservation project. The effect here, a sort of diaphanous box, is both to protect and to expose. After the shock of the damage to Mackintosh’s Glasgow School of Art in the 2018 fire, this house, arguably Mackintosh’s best, has appeared extra-precious and the showcase effect suits it well, adding to its mystery. The similarity with the work of Lacaton & Vassal in Dunkirk is clear.

A large warehouse-like structure with translucent sides and a steel enclosure covers a small building

Charles Rennie Mackintosh’s Hill House in Helensburgh, Scotland suffered water damage. . . © Alamy Stock Photo

The structure seen from the inside, with the small building on the left and the new sheet steel wall on the right

. . . Carmody Groarke therefore locked it in a stainless steel wire mesh to protect it, while keeping the building visible © Alamy Stock Photo

You could argue that this phenomenon in architecture – greenhouses and glass boxes, display cases and poly-agri enclosures – is a manifestation of angst, an idea that either architecture must be protected or we must be protected in its breast. But I would say there is something more.

After astronaut William Anders took the “Earthrise” photo of Apollo 8 on Christmas Eve 1968, the inhabitants of the planet he captured were mesmerized by the delicacy of its glowing atmosphere, the membrane that allows us to live our life. Awareness of the impending climate catastrophe has rekindled this understanding of fragility.

German philosopher Peter Sloterdijk has written extensively on his theory of modern architecture as a manifestation of the bubble idea, from the Crystal Palace to the glass-roofed arcades of Paris to the capitalist recreation megastructures. The French philosopher Bruno Latour also sees our understanding of space in these terms, what he calls the “Umwelt”, the world lived by an organism, that is to say mainly us.

A two-story house with a flat roof sits in a large translucent structure
Maison Latapie de Lacaton & Vassal in Floirac-Bordeaux, France © Philippe Ruault

The architects of the 1960s nurtured a fetish for mega-infrastructures, entire worlds under glass, air-conditioned, whose inhabitants never left their personal bubbles. Buckminster Fuller even imagined Manhattan under a glass roof. With our malls, airports, data centers and distribution centers, the prophecy has gone from visionary to mundane; it is the daily requirement for many. But this new manifestation of the bubble is something else. Delicate and intimate, it is a daily showcase where architecture and its users are like objects in a museum showcase.

While half a century ago bubble architecture was a way to create artificial worlds (which themselves recur in the interplanetary visions of Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos), this new architecture, rather than d ‘insisting on artifice, highlights the authenticity and value, the uniqueness of the historical object and our separation from the authentic, its inaccessibility in our time. It is a way of remaking architecture as a curator, building without committing. A greenhouse or a polycarbonate box is a ready-made, a deviation from design through the adoption and adaptation of everyday life and the catalog of parts. He makes us understand that the material, the dwelling and the Earth itself are fragile and precarious, a heavy burden for a delicate box.

Edwin Heathcote is the architecture and design critic of the FT


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Do we really want to let tax law kill Australian documentaries? | Canberra weather http://tahaoglu.net/do-we-really-want-to-let-tax-law-kill-australian-documentaries-canberra-weather/ Wed, 25 Aug 2021 19:25:00 +0000 http://tahaoglu.net/do-we-really-want-to-let-tax-law-kill-australian-documentaries-canberra-weather/ news, breaking news, documentary, incentives, funding, australia, senatorial committee, australian screen production incentives We live in an interesting area. As with any significant event, what we record and capture today will become the basis for how future generations understand our present as their history. Documentary film has always played an important role in shaping our […]]]>

news, breaking news, documentary, incentives, funding, australia, senatorial committee, australian screen production incentives

We live in an interesting area. As with any significant event, what we record and capture today will become the basis for how future generations understand our present as their history. Documentary film has always played an important role in shaping our historical, social and cultural narratives – both as a mirror of contemporary society and as a historical document. But now the future of the documentary is in jeopardy. Last week, the Senate Standing Committee called an inquiry into legislation that will change Australia’s incentives for screen production. These incentives play a vital role in the documentary industry – providing crucial support for filmmakers to create and tell Australian stories. The proposed changes have the potential to decimate the documentary industry. By increasing the eligible budget threshold for support to $ 1 million and capping support for archives and overseas filming, we risk losing a third of Australia’s feature documentaries. Documentary feature films occupy a unique place in our cultural, media and historical landscape. They go beyond the headlines of the news – giving us the whole complex, nuanced and diverse story. Documentaries like Gayby Baby, Firestarter and Embrace allow us to put ourselves in other people’s shoes, see what’s going on in our society, put a face to social issues and capture our cultural narrative. They take us to different worlds; climb Everest with Sherpa, visit the underwater worlds in blue and enter the mind of a musician through Mystify: Michael Hutchence. When our politicians debate this bill, they are deliberating on the future of our national voice. It is a turning point. These documentaries, which offer jobs and career paths within the industry, also offer excellent social results. They support the nonprofit sector, enabling organizations to raise awareness and fund. The documentary Backtrack Boys has raised millions of dollars to support underprivileged children in the bush. We rarely see these stories on our broadcasters in the age of wall-to-wall reality TV. READ MORE: Documentary industry asking for no additional support. The current guidelines aim to support Australian documentaries at a very low cost to the government. Feature documentaries have received an average of $ 9 million in support from Screen Australia through Producer Offset over the past five years – just 7 percent of the $ 620 million that has been provided to the entire film industry. . The cost of supporting feature documentaries is negligible, while the loss to the industry and to our national history would be significant. We ask that the current guidelines remain the same, so that Australian stories can continue to be made, told and seen. At the Documentary Australia Foundation, we see the passion and courage of documentary filmmakers. We see them making their films over many years, on small budgets, often without paying for themselves as they strive to make sure these stories are told. We also see the real impact of these documentaries – on the people involved and on the people who see them. As a documentary filmmaker myself, I saw this with my own eyes. When I did Ka-Ching! Pokie Nation in 2015, I wanted to challenge the narrative around poker machine addiction. I thought the film would be a powerful tool for activists and activists. What I didn’t realize was how much it would empower the people who had been through this story, who felt seen and understood. This film has been seen by over a million people. But his biggest impact on me came from an email I received from someone who told me it helped him stop playing. Instead of going to play the slot machines, he would watch the DVD. We find ourselves in a symbolic place – where the future of documentary storytelling in Australia could be decided by what is essentially tax law. It’s an age-old question: what is the value of art? In the case of the documentary, its value is clear. It is a historic record. It is our national history. It must be saved.

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Mahalla Stories – Video & Film http://tahaoglu.net/mahalla-stories-video-film/ Mon, 23 Aug 2021 23:01:36 +0000 http://tahaoglu.net/mahalla-stories-video-film/ The Republic of Uzbekistan participates for the first time in the 17th International Architecture Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia with the exhibition Mahalla: Urban rural life, commissioned by the Foundation for the Development of Art and Culture under the Ministry of Culture of the Republic of Uzbekistan, organized by Emanuel Christ and Christoph Gantenbein, […]]]>

The Republic of Uzbekistan participates for the first time in the 17th International Architecture Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia with the exhibition Mahalla: Urban rural life, commissioned by the Foundation for the Development of Art and Culture under the Ministry of Culture of the Republic of Uzbekistan, organized by Emanuel Christ and Christoph Gantenbein, professors of architecture and design at ETH Zurich, and founding partners of Christ & Gantenbein, and presenting works by Spanish filmmaker Carlos Casas, Dutch photographer Bas Princen and CCA Lab Tashkent.

Along with the current exhibition, Uzbekistan presents “Mahalla Stories”, a series of educational events and programs that take place in August and October, including concerts organized by sound artist and filmmaker Carlos Casas and lectures organized by ETH Zurich. “Mahalla Stories” will present the public at the Venice Biennale with an overview of local Uzbek music and sound ecology; on how the mahallas influenced the work of artists; on the creative process behind the exhibition; and of course, on Uzbek architecture.

A selection of these events will be broadcast on e-flux on August 24, 25, 26 and 31.

Program

August 24, 4-6 p.m. CET, Uzbek Pavilion – Streaming
Concert
Organized by Carlos Casas

The famous Shodiyona set and the singer maqom Khushnud Solijonov together will demonstrate the beauty of traditional Uzbek musical culture.

Karnay and surnay are two very similar Uzbek instruments, but at the same time different. Nicknay is considered to be the closest relative of the Caucasian zurna since ancient times. Due to its rare and powerful sound, the nickname has become one of the main national musical instruments. Karnay is a long copper pipe made up of two or three elbows. Strictly speaking, it is not even a musical instrument, but a signal instrument. It is difficult to confuse the sounds of karnay with anything else because after hearing it once, you can recognize it among thousands of other sounds. Karnay and surnay are widely used together in various national celebrations, including marriage and birth ceremonies.

The art of maqom is a unique phenomenon in the culture of artistic song of the peoples of the Middle East: it has its origin in pre-Islamic antiquity, and its formation and development are associated with the era of the “Eastern Renaissance”. .


August 25, 6-7 p.m. CET, Palazzo Grassi – streaming
Open discussion

Chloe Drieu (CNRS researcher) discusses Uzbek cinema and culture with Saodat Ismailova (director and artist) before the screening of the Uzbek black and white comedy All the Mahalla is talking about it (1960), directed and produced by eminent Uzbek filmmaker Shukhrat Abbosov. The film is considered one of the best Uzbek films of all time, and Shukhrat Abbosov, who received a USSR National Artist Award for his works, is celebrated as one of the founders of the industry Uzbek cinema.

The events of the film take place in a mahalla, a traditional Uzbek neighborhood, in an old part of Tashkent, at a time when large-scale construction work is taking place. The film humorously depicts the relationship between traditional parents and their modern children.


August 26, 2 pm-5pm CET, Uzbek Pavilion – Streaming
Discussion: Architecture of commons

Emmanuel Christ and Christoph Gantenbein, curators of the Uzbek Pavilion, will engage in a discussion with Tom avermaete, Artyom Kosmarsky, Anna puigjaner, Alexey Ulko (moderator), and Gayane Umerova on the implications that the commons, as social, economic and political processes, have in architecture and urban design.

Christ & Gantenbein is an international firm dedicated to the broad field of architecture founded in 1998 by Emanuel Christ and Christoph Gantenbein and headquartered in Basel, Switzerland. The company’s most significant completed projects include the expansion and transformation of the Swiss National Museum in Zurich and the extension of the Kunstmuseum Basel, two world-class cultural monuments. In 2020, the office completed the multifunctional Lindt Home of Chocolate, a monumental yet versatile space for Lindt & Sprüngli in Zurich. In addition, C&G is working on a wide range of projects across Europe, including a social housing development in Paris, a multi-purpose office building for Roche in Germany, the extension of the Wallraf-Richartz museum in Cologne, a building of housing and offices in the historic center of Hamburg, a new laboratory and office building in St. Gallen, and more recently the extension of MACBA in Barcelona. Practice and research are closely linked in the work of Christ & Gantenbein, an aspect which is reflected in the continuing academic teaching of Emmanuel Christ and Christoph Gantenbein. Since 2018, they have been full professors of architecture and design at ETH Zurich. Publications include Italy Pictures (2011), Christ and Gantenbein around the corner (2012), Typology: Hong Kong, Rome, New York, Buenos Aires, Zürich (2012) and Typology: Paris, Delhi, São Paulo, Athens (2015).

Tom avermaete is professor of history and theory of urban design at ETH Zurich. His research focuses on the architecture of the city and the evolution of the roles, approaches and tools of architects and urban planners from an intercultural perspective. Recent book publications include Architecture of the welfare state (with Mark Swenarton and Dirk van den Heuvel, 2014), The balcony (with Rem Koolhaas, 2014), Casablanca – Chandigarh (with Maristella Casciato, 2015), Europe shopping towns (with Janina Gosseye, 2017), and Acculturation of the shopping center (with Janina Gosseye, 2018). Avermaete organized the exhibitions In the desert of modernity (Berlin, Casablanca, 2008, 2009), Casablanca – Chandigarh (Montreal, 2015), and Lived-In: the modern city as a performative infrastructure (Antwerp, 2017). He is editor of OASE.

Artyom Kosmarski is a Moscow-based social anthropologist (HSE University Cultural Research Institute). He has conducted extensive research in Uzbekistan since 2002 focusing on the city’s vernacular narratives and the oral history of urban spaces, particularly what mahalla means to people in Tashkent, the capital of Uzbekistan.

Anna puigjaner is Associate Professor of Professional Practice at Columbia GSAPP and Coordinator of Core I Architecture Studios. Puigjaner unites theory and practice by combining academic, research and editorial work with the professional activity of MAIO, an architectural firm co-founded in Barcelona in 2012. MAIO collaborates with artists and practitioners from outside and is particularly interested in the development of new models of collective housing. Recent projects include “110 Rooms” – an innovative 22-unit housing block in Barcelona – and a series of exhibition designs for the Milan Furniture Fair and the Barcelona Museum of Contemporary Art, among others. His ongoing research and writings on the “City without a Kitchen” have been published in various forms, notably in The quantified house (Lars Müller Publishers, 2014) and Together! The collective’s new architecture (Ruby Press, 2017).

Alexey Ulko holds an MEd TTELT degree from the University of Exeter (UK), and is a member of the European Society for Central Asian Studies, Association of Art Historians (UK ) and the Central Eurasian Studies Society (United States).

Gayane Umerova is Executive Director of the Foundation for the Development of Art and Culture under the Ministry of Culture of the Republic of Uzbekistan and Secretary General of the National Commission of the Republic of Uzbekistan for UNESCO. Gayane holds a BA in Business Administration from the University of Westminster and an MA in Art Commerce from Sotheby’s Institute of Art, University of Manchester. In 2014 and 2015, she was also a consultant at Christie’s auction house. After more than ten years at the Uzbekistan Art Gallery, she was appointed Deputy Executive Director of the Foundation for the Development of Art and Culture under the Ministry of Culture of the Republic of Uzbekistan (ACDF ) in 2017.


August 31 from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. CET, Uzbek Pavilion – streaming
Sound sessions at the Uzbekistan Pavilion (concert)

With Enrico Malatesta (percussions / objects), Giovanni lami (samples, electronics), and Glauco Salve (field recordings, electronics)

The Uzbekistan Pavilion is pleased to invite three of Italy’s most interesting musicians and sound practitioners, whose practice blurs the boundaries of improvisation, sound ecology, object resonance and practices of deep listening. A special live improvisation session using percussion / objects, field recordings, samples and electronics and activating the horn with new sounds.


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The state of the social sciences http://tahaoglu.net/the-state-of-the-social-sciences/ Sun, 22 Aug 2021 20:03:07 +0000 http://tahaoglu.net/the-state-of-the-social-sciences/ The social sciences emerging from the 18th century with the classic “Wealth of Nations” by Adam Smith, 1776 aimed at theorizing the interface of human behavior with economic interests and the growing trade between nations. The post-industrial revolution of 1760 and the maturation of 1840 changed the outlook not only for North American and European […]]]>

The social sciences emerging from the 18th century with the classic “Wealth of Nations” by Adam Smith, 1776 aimed at theorizing the interface of human behavior with economic interests and the growing trade between nations. The post-industrial revolution of 1760 and the maturation of 1840 changed the outlook not only for North American and European societies, but also changed perceptions of societies around the world.

Societies, over time and space, have undergone a noticeable shift in class perceptions, values, behavior and interests, thus paving the way for social scientists to study new relationships in new ones. phenomena. Some branches of the social sciences, for example economics, known as the king of social sciences, examined the theories that reigned until the Great Depression of the 1930s, when classical theories of economics completely and miserably went downhill. the survival of the “laissez faire” rule failed. and crippled the world’s economies.

The New Economy is based on the establishment of new relationships in a given phenomenon in societies, creating new knowledge about new relationships of human actions in the face of societies and social groups, embodying rigorous scientific methodologies based on precision,

finally institutionalize the world economic order, currently in place, dictated by the IBRD and the IMF. Among social science disciplines, economics has relied heavily on sophisticated tools and techniques drawn from mathematics and physics to ensure the accuracy of testing theories against observed body data in order to establish new relationships. phenomena, thus increasing the theoretical foundations of knowledge likely to confront the observed observations. data to restore, reject or modify the existing theory. Therefore, he widely used differential equations, tensor calculus, mathematical logic, linear and dynamic programming, etc. many developing countries of the world. Today the subject has become a parent discipline within and outside the social sciences, for example, management, sociology, health economics, engineering economics, geography and regional development. , etc. comes to the degree of service. The reception capacity of the Delhi School of Economics at the University of Delhi today is mainly filled by applicants whose parent discipline is physics or mathematics at the expense of bona fide economics.

Social scientists have put more or less effort into observing data and studying the relationships in a given phenomenon rather than using curious minds for the inductive foundations of a phenomenon, developing a theory, or theorizing a problem. Among the social sciences, sociology, an important discipline of the social sciences, is primarily interested in the study of the relationships determining social behavior and assumes that behavior in turn is influenced by social, political, professional, intellectual and social groupings. by the particular setting in which they are found. themselves at one point or another. It owes its roots to Emile Durkheim of the University of Bordeaux, George Herbert Meade and Max Weber in 19e century to lay the foundations of the discipline and in the contemporary world sociologists make fragile attempts to quantify social relations in human societies using sociometry, etc. anthropology and cultural anthropology. Likewise, geography is concerned with studying the various environments of places, the spatial interactions of the Earth’s surface, ultimately human interactions in the natural environment, thus expanding the scope of Ptolemy of the second century who limited geography to a study of the representation of the phenomena of the known world in images only. In 20e deductive inferences of the century with regard to phenomena, the discipline of social sciences has tested theories against observations, using sociometry, psychometry and statistical techniques, therefore, cannot be considered a pleonasm and even them Writing and writing techniques and methods are an integral part of the standard scientific methodology being used in social science research. It should be borne in mind that the post-war economy, using advanced methods and techniques of physics, mathematics and engineering, ignoring the fact that it deals with the human mind and human behavior has become a vulgar economy. The accuracy of the physical sciences or the life sciences, based on laboratory research under controlled conditions, cannot be ipso facto applicable to macro or micro social relationships, variable, in the social sciences to be a science of society human in which social groups stratified as a social laboratory to investigate and research is not under conditions of control.

Contemporary scientific investigations dominated by interdisciplinary research in multidisciplinary institutions around the world, on the one hand, and the horizontal expansion of disciplines in academic institutions, on the other hand, have to a large extent narrowed the gap between science and the social sciences precisely for the decimation of scientific knowledge for the public good and humanity, hence the conceptualization of the hierarchical order of the material sciences, social sciences, technological sciences is still to be considered. The Nobel Prize won for peace and literature in the world by women exceeds 26%, a significant proportion, while for medicine, chemistry, physics and economics, more than 8% reflects the presence of gender in the research.

In the global gender participation scenario, or looking at the index of women’s participation, in the US technology and R&D sector alone, 47 percent are women and globally 25 percent of national parliamentarians are women and just under 50 percent of working-age women are in the labor force, a sustained figure over the period. Global tech giants Amazon, Apple, Face Book, Google and Microsoft have 34.4% women in their workforce and there are 14 countries in the world with 50% women in the firm. The weakening of the role of women in universities and decision-making processes demonstrates ignorance especially in the post-war period.

Social sciences in developing societies

Social science in developing societies has yet to make a dent in research, the level of physical science and technology probably economics could be an exception. When I was at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Economics in the mid-1980s, there were 56 departments in one discipline, economics at what is now called the University of Economics of Budapest. Developing societies initiated the interdisciplinary approach to multidisciplinary research very late and in the era of post-globalization, these developing countries, unlike China, have shown more inhibitions to evolve with the wind and the time in academic reforms, thus infusing more technology – loopholes, a pressing problem in developing economies facing today. Research in our institutions continues to be stereotyped, even research in the natural sciences is sometimes hampered by the insufficiency of modern scientific equipment available in laboratories. Standard scientific methodology, as a critical scientific inquiry, used in social science research integrates, as a prelude, the fundamentals – concept, variables, hypothesis, measurement / quantification and theories, axioms, principles and laws. Researchers, during the review of studies on the subject, must identify the knowledge gaps that the discipline they intend to fill to add to the stock of knowledge, would develop social science analytics. The unfortunate digital technology misplaced in the hands of some, the use of “copy and paste” and “investigator methodology instead of acquiring knowledge on the subject remains ignorant on the subject. Cut-and-paste and download technologies are having a negative impact on the growth of the social sciences. The concept of extensive and intensive reading has been lacking in our institutions and even perceptions about it. Today we join academic research precisely for the reason of the zero opportunity cost as human capital, the losses, devoid of the degree of utility as a human resource, realize their added value nor motivated by the market nor by demand, therefore, only add to the stock of human resources with zero opportunity cost. This is why we feel we belong to a secondary discipline. The integration of technological inputs with standard scientific methodology tends to optimal solutions for the social and economic problems being the subject of the social sciences.

Professor Nisar Ali, Former, Director and Dean, Faculty of Social Sciences and Member, State Finance Commission, J&K Government.


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Obiano hiding under Ojukwu’s philosophy to perpetrate corruption – Group http://tahaoglu.net/obiano-hiding-under-ojukwus-philosophy-to-perpetrate-corruption-group/ Sun, 22 Aug 2021 11:45:09 +0000 http://tahaoglu.net/obiano-hiding-under-ojukwus-philosophy-to-perpetrate-corruption-group/ An umbrella organization for socio-political platforms, Global Initiatives for Good Governance (GIGG) has denounced Governor Willie Obiano of Anambra state for lack of accountability since the start of his administration. The pro-democracy group questioned the level of credibility, fairness and performance of the government led by Obiano in the management of state resources, claiming that […]]]>

An umbrella organization for socio-political platforms, Global Initiatives for Good Governance (GIGG) has denounced Governor Willie Obiano of Anambra state for lack of accountability since the start of his administration.

The pro-democracy group questioned the level of credibility, fairness and performance of the government led by Obiano in the management of state resources, claiming that from the creation of the government to this day, Anambra is characterized by alleged looting and senseless embezzlement of public funds under the leadership of Obiano, regretting that the funds should have been spent on the development of the education sector, health facilities, road projects and agricultural subsidies to state farmers to attract monumental and comprehensive infrastructural development to the state.

On the contrary, the group said Obiano’s government has shown a lack of high-level accountability, which has left the state with developmental delay for the past 20 years.

The Global Initiative for Good Governance, in a statement signed by its CEO, Chief Emeka Kalu, and sent to DAILY POST on Sunday, noted that erosion accidents had been one of the environmental risks facing various communities in Anambra State, further regretting that the enormous amount of embezzled funds could have been used to remedy these situations.

The socio-political body postulated that Obiano did not lead by example in leading an open-door policy where every drop of government decisions and actions is neutrally subjected to scrutiny, vigilance and scrutiny. accountability, thereby restoring public confidence in public affairs and governance.

According to the GIGG, the governor is currently working very hard to ensure that his party wins the next state governorate election by hiding under the philosophical mantle of our respected Igbo leader of blessed memory, Chief Chukwuemeka Odimegwu Ojukwu , the founder of the APGA to perpetrate and perpetuate injustice, corruption and greed against the will of Ndi Anambra.

The GIGG, however, held the state leadership to account as it was ready, willing and eager to publish evidence capable of proving beyond a reasonable doubt that the government of Obiano looted and is still plundering the treasury of ‘Anambra.

The group also stated in part: “Global Initiatives for Good Governance (GIGG) is an umbrella body for socio-political platforms whose responsibilities are to scale, assess and evaluate performance or not. leaders of our contemporary society and make public comments to that effect. . To whom much has been given, much is also expected of him and this statement is attributed to Chief Willy Obiano, Executive Governor of Anambra State on the current state of his credibility in the performance of his statutory duties with the people of Anambra State. .

“Our functions as a light indicator to observe how things are working in governance through intelligent collection have carefully studied and investigated to a reasonable extent and confirmed without inhibition heaps of looting, embezzlement and mismanagement of funds attributable to Governor Willie Obiano in the United States of America. .

“It is confirmed that he personally secured for his private use and his property several apartment complexes worth billions of dollars in the United States, regardless of the suffering of the poor, the destitute and the unemployed. these excesses and this imprudence.

“Moreover, if these embezzled funds were invested in agriculture, it would go a long way in increasing, reorganizing and revitalizing the state economy by boasting of maximum production of goods and services. Anambra State is one of the nation’s major food baskets where local rice, yams, cereal crops and other economical trees survive and grow, this personally coveted fund could have helped the state to achieve milestones of success in this area of ​​life.

“In our service to humanity there is no sacred cow treated with kid gloves as we work to ensure the right thing is done to rid Nigeria of the blatant corrupt rulers coming to power to amass wealth and abuse public trust ”.

Meanwhile, Gov. Willie Obiano said his administration had invested 7.2 billion naira in community development projects in the state’s 181 communities.

Obiano revealed this through the State Commissioner for Economic Planning, Budget and Development Partners, Mark Okoye, during the 2021 public presentation of the achievements of the Community and Social Development Agency of Anambra State in Awka, the state capital.

Okoye enumerated the desire of communities for direct assistance through a community development program that can shape their destiny, empowering communities to be heard and building their capacities to support development and management. funds by beneficiaries to help reduce corruption as some of the lessons learned during the implementation process.


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The 14 best graduates of the year from the PHmuseum http://tahaoglu.net/the-14-best-graduates-of-the-year-from-the-phmuseum/ Thu, 12 Aug 2021 00:06:58 +0000 http://tahaoglu.net/the-14-best-graduates-of-the-year-from-the-phmuseum/ For the second year in a row, with the intention of spotting and showcasing the work of emerging photography talents, we contacted over 100 photography institutions and universities around the world and asked their tutors to nominate them. most remarkable young graduates. International Youth Day, celebrated every August 12 since 1999, is an initiative that […]]]>

For the second year in a row, with the intention of spotting and showcasing the work of emerging photography talents, we contacted over 100 photography institutions and universities around the world and asked their tutors to nominate them. most remarkable young graduates.

International Youth Day, celebrated every August 12 since 1999, is an initiative that aims to highlight the potential and active role in global youth society, giving voice to their concerns and emphasizing the importance of their participation in the crucial problems of contemporary society. . For the occasion, at the PHmuseum we have decided to promote the work of young photographers each year, this year by making a selection of the 14 best graduates.

Barbara debeuckelaere

Graduated from KASK School of Arts Gent | Belgium

Nominated by Anne-Françoise Lesuisse

After years of development work and journalism in radio and television, Barbara Debeuckelaere (Belgium) pursued visual art and photography to express herself. In her photographic work, she is driven by hypercapitalism and standardization, ultimately producing discreetly critical and poetic images, videos and installations.

Yang bowei

Graduated from the Royal College of Art | UK

Nominated by Sarah Jones

Bowei Yang (born 1994 in Hangzhou China) is a photographer based in Beijing and London. Her work documents contemporary queer adolescents living in China combined with staged memories of her childhood, while also attempting to question self-identity in awareness of various collective identifications and group traumas. His works are inspired by Chinese philosophy and literature, constructed to reflect on the reality of documents through the medium of photography.

Camille Juarez

Graduated from CAMPO_Fotolibros (Gimnasio de Arte y Cultura & Proyecto Imaginario) | Mexico / Argentina

Nominated by José Luis Cuevas

Camile Juárez was born in 1997 in Mixco, Guatemala, where she lives and works. She is a Maya K’iche artist and her practice sits at the intersection of feminism, art, anthropology and social change. Camile is part of the CAMPO photo book program, where she is currently working on her first photo book.

Denis serrano

Graduated from Gimnasio de Arte y Cultura | Mexico

Nominated by Livia Animas

Denis Serrano (Mexico, 1990) is interested in exploring and opening a debate around mental health, misogyny and domestic violence through photography. She holds a degree in Design (FAD 2012, UNAM) and has followed diploma courses in artistic production. His work has been exhibited in Mexico, Spain, China and the UK.

Joselito Verschaeve

Graduated from KASK School of Arts Gent | Belgium

Nominated by Anne-Françoise Lesuisse

Joselito Verschaeve (born 1996) is an artist living and working in Ghent, Belgium. His practice focuses on the photographic medium, often having the photo book as a point of interest. His work deconstructs reality and gives a new context to these scenes which are based on themes of dystopia, literature and world construction.

Lina Van Hulle

Graduated from the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp | Belgium

Nominated by Bert Danckaert

Lina Van Hulle (Belgium, 1998) holds a master’s degree in photography from the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp. She works with different mediums such as photography, video and sound. His work can be described as a cinematic visual translation of life in the future.

Manuela Lorente

Graduated from EFTI – Centro Internacional de Fotografía y Cine | Spain

Nominated by Ricardo Cases, Juan Valbuena & Maria Santoyo

Manuela Lorente (born 1991) is a photographer born and based in Madrid. She is immersed in storytelling through documentary photography in the form of photo novels. Told in a humorous and casual tone, reality and fiction are often intertwined, bringing into play “costumbrismo”, popular culture, personal relationships and tradition, as well as the identity of its city.

Misaki shimizu

University of Westminster graduate | UK

Nominated by Gavin Jack

Misaki Shimizu was born in 1998 in Kyoto, Japan. She currently lives and works in Tokyo and London. She obtained a Bachelor of Arts in Photography from the University of Westminster in London. In her practice, she explores the daily psychological experience of the world and transforms these intangible elements into images. His work is influenced by the way the mental state is reflected subconsciously in photography.

Ofoe Amegavie

Graduated from World Press Photo West Africa Visual Journalism Fellowship | Netherlands

Nominated by Nii Obodai, Marc Prust and Emilie Regnier

Ofoe Amegavie is a Ghanaian photographer passionate about all that is cultural and spiritual in human societies. It is inspired by the ancestors of its own family, dating back to Togbui Sri I of Anloga, and its history of migration from the Volta region to the Ada-Foah coast in the Greater Accra region. He created his unique style by taking a curious approach and spiritual perspective to fine art, fashion and documentary photography, describing his culture and heritage through an intimate glimpse of everyday encounters.

Sadie Catt

Graduated from the University of the West of England | UK

Nominated by Aaron Schuman

Sadie Catt is a British photographer currently based in Bristol. His work has been published by organizations such as The British Journal of Photography and Splash & Grab Magazine and exhibited at the Royal Photographic Society IPE 162 and the Side Gallery.

Sarah Hartvigsen Juncker and Louise Herrche Serum

Graduated from the Danish School of Media and Journalism | Denmark

Nominated by Søren Pagter

Sarah Hartvigsen Juncker and Louise Herrche Serup are both Danish documentary photographers recently graduated from the Danish School of Media and Journalism (DMJX) and currently based in Copenhagen. Through intimate portraits and reportage photographs, their work explores social topics such as mental health, inequalities and gender.

Sari Soininen

Graduated from the University of the West of England Bristol | UK

Nominated by Aaron Schuman

Sari Soininen (born 1991) is a Finnish photographer based in Bristol, UK. Sari’s colorful otherworldly photograph draws inspiration from philosophical thoughts and personal mystical experiences. Its interest is to provide the viewer with alternative ways of seeing reality and the world around it.

Sean sborlino

Graduated from Grisart Escola Internacional de Fotografia | Spain

Nominated by Enric Montes

Sean Sborlino (1994) is an Anglo-Italian photographer based in Barcelona. He conceives of photography as a practice to sharpen his way of seeing reality, reducing speed and allowing himself to be surprised by the extraordinary hidden in the mundane. The result is a refined form of visual storytelling that addresses the blurred line between reality and illusion.

Tripty Tamang Pakhrin

Photo.circle graduate | Nepal

Nominated by NayanTara Gurung Kakshapati

Tripty Tamang Pakhrin (1995) works and lives in Kathmandu, Nepal. His work explores the notions of space, memory and youth. She is one of the recipients of the VII Fondation Alexandra Boulat Grant 2019 and is currently associated with Photo Kathmandu, an international photography biennial that takes place in Kathmandu. She loves cooking and acting.

If you are a university professor, a representative of a photography school, or if you are interested in involving the institution where you are studying in our initiative, write to us at info@phmuseum.com so that we can add you to our contact list and send you an invitation for the 2022 edition.


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