Journalism – Tahaoglu http://tahaoglu.net/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 09:49:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://tahaoglu.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-150x150.png Journalism – Tahaoglu http://tahaoglu.net/ 32 32 Over 80 African journalists trained in fact-checking and health communication http://tahaoglu.net/over-80-african-journalists-trained-in-fact-checking-and-health-communication/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 09:20:38 +0000 http://tahaoglu.net/over-80-african-journalists-trained-in-fact-checking-and-health-communication/ While thanking the support of the EU, Yumiko Yokozeki, Director of the UNESCO Liaison Office in Addis Ababa to the AU and ECA, stressed that through this initiative, UNESCO has strengthened its partnership with Africa CDC, health ministries, universities, scientists, media partners and the facts. controllers. It will continue to leverage its partnership with ISAAA […]]]>

While thanking the support of the EU, Yumiko Yokozeki, Director of the UNESCO Liaison Office in Addis Ababa to the AU and ECA, stressed that through this initiative, UNESCO has strengthened its partnership with Africa CDC, health ministries, universities, scientists, media partners and the facts. controllers. It will continue to leverage its partnership with ISAAA AfriCenter and Africa Check to support the community media sector which has the capacity to reach the widest audience in remote areas through their local languages.

Africa Check deputy director Retha Langa reiterated the need for collaborative efforts to tackle disinformation and improve media reporting on health. According to him, as a fact-checking organization, Africa Check cannot fight disinformation on its own. Therefore, one of the main outcomes of the training is improved knowledge and confidence in reporting the impact of COVID-19 on NCDs, as evidenced by positive feedback from beneficiaries.

The official closing of the training was an opportunity to present the Knowledge of Life Sciences in Africa (ALSK) portal, through which journalists can get training and capacity building to help them thoroughly investigate, interview thoroughly and fully understand science and health issues before reporting them.


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9/11 journalism course from the Wall Street Journal and New York Times Pulitzer-winning teams – Poynter http://tahaoglu.net/9-11-journalism-course-from-the-wall-street-journal-and-new-york-times-pulitzer-winning-teams-poynter/ Mon, 13 Sep 2021 15:10:01 +0000 http://tahaoglu.net/9-11-journalism-course-from-the-wall-street-journal-and-new-york-times-pulitzer-winning-teams-poynter/ Of the thousands of articles written and circulated to coincide with this month’s anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, few have focused on what newsrooms, across the spectrum of national and local media , learned while covering the disaster. The two of us – former Wall Street Journal reporting colleagues from years before […]]]>

Of the thousands of articles written and circulated to coincide with this month’s anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, few have focused on what newsrooms, across the spectrum of national and local media , learned while covering the disaster.

The two of us – former Wall Street Journal reporting colleagues from years before September 11 – have each written about Pulitzer Prize-winning journalism through publications that covered this tragedy.

(Recent book by Rotbart “September 12: Ground Zero September 11 with the Wall Street Journal” examines the work that culminated in this newspaper’s Pulitzer for Breaking News Reporting in 2002. And Harris 2016 “Pulitzer’s Gold: A Century of Public Service Journalism” dedicates a chapter to the coverage of September 11 by The New York Times, which won that newspaper’s public service award in 2002. Harris also wrote an article 10 years later for Poynter, in 2011, on the work of the Journal.)

The Times and the Journal were two of the most prominent news organizations addressing the many challenges that the September 11 terrorist attacks presented. However, they were far from alone. Broadcast and cable news channels provided vivid, uninterrupted wall-to-wall coverage, with videos and stories from the field that none of us can forget.

The Washington Post and Los Angeles Times ran same-day 9/11 editions of the attacks. The Associated Press provided real-time updates, mobilizing its staff to gather feedback from around the world. And many emerging online news sites foreshadowed their eventual rise to prominence with original and timely reporting.

Before the media criticism of this 20-year-old tragedy wears off, we want to highlight some lessons that news outlets of all stripes can learn from The Times and Journal’s experience of covering what we have. called the Pearl Harbor of our generation.

This exchange of questions and answers is the result.

Did the Journal or The Times have contingency plans in place to effectively cover a major disaster such as September 11?

Roy Harris: Neither newspaper had any plans to deal with a disaster of the magnitude of 9/11, although The Times is better suited for this, as the newspaper’s core job often involves covering the New York disturbances. at different levels.

It would have been difficult to conceive of an “exercise” at The Times that would model such a massive disaster, with so many variables.

From a production standpoint, however, the Times had some role models to follow, including a system to remove ads from its first section and free up space for unexpected chunks of news in the event of a crisis.

The Times had another advantage in facilitating coverage of the first day: it was prepared on September 11 to report on the New York primary elections that day. This allowed for the reassignment of editors and journalists in the short term – especially after the cancellation of the primary.

Dean Rotbart: No one at the Journal ever imagined a disaster that would decimate their newsroom and shut down all journalists and editors for nearly a year.

The Journal has held back-up drills from time to time, considering the possibility of a power outage or weather system that would require a very temporary move.

The South Brunswick, New Jersey, administrative offices of Dow Jones, owner of The Journal, is 50 miles southwest of the Lower Manhattan Newsroom. These offices had training rooms that most editors knew could, in a pinch, be converted into temporary news offices. By September 11, about 40 Journal staff – about a tenth of its regular staff in New York – had directed the gauntlet to southern Brunswick and were responsible for editing and composing the next day’s edition.

How did Journal culture – driven from its main newsroom and headquarters – come into play on September 11?

Rotbart: In the Journal’s pop-up newsroom in South Brunswick, New Jersey, and in apartments scattered across the five boroughs of New York and New Jersey where Journal staff members gathered in small groups, the “ghosts” of the former newsroom leaders were undoubtedly present.

Dating back to the early 1940s, when Bernard “Barney” Kilgore began transforming The Journal from a failed 33,000-copy business newspaper into one of the most respected and widely read newspapers in the country, an unbroken chain of executives transmitted and strengthened Kilgore’s core business. principles.

This included giving journalists ample leeway to work independently and take reasonable risks in an effort to elevate the journalistic advantage of the newspaper. On September 11, Journal staff did not have to be told what to do. On their own, they thought about how they could be most useful, and they got down to it.

Journal culture also involved making sure that most journalists with regular industry rhythms also devote time to general “spotlight”. Thus, writing on subjects of general interest was familiar even to its specialists in economic information.

An unassailable standard governed September 11, as it did every other day: journalists had to establish their facts without exception. Integrity and professionalism have remained their guides.

On a joint show on YouTube, Dean Rotbart (left) appeared with Roy J. Harris Jr.

The Times and the Journal are both known for their excellent newsroom editors, with strong management structures below them. How were these personalities tasked with bringing staff to such extraordinary results under extreme pressure?

Rotbart: If anyone ever needed an illustration of why it is essential for a news organization to have a “deep bench” of knowledgeable editors, the Wall Street Journal’s experience of 9/11 is a great help. almost perfect example. Until early afternoon, Paul E. Steiger, editor of the newspaper and North Star reporter, was missing and feared his death.

With the closure of bridges and tunnels, Steiger’s four deputy directors were unable to reach the emergency pop-up press room in southern Brunswick. Barely missing a beat, Alan Murray, then Washington, DC bureau chief, assigned and oversaw most of the front page stories that day. National news editor Marcus Brauchli, working from his home in Brooklyn Heights, generated the “sked” – the plan for the next day’s newspaper and kept a diary of people who reported and were still missing.

Office managers Karen Blumenthal, Kevin Helliker and Jonathan Friedland, in Dallas, Chicago and Los Angeles, respectively, mobilized their staff and handled overflow editing tasks and coverage of other offices.

Perhaps most impressive of all, Frank James “Jim” Pensiero, a senior newsroom administrator who managed the Journal’s newsroom budget and negotiated contracts, among other management duties, took on responsibility in southern Brunswick for staffing and overseeing the writing and production teams.

If need be, any of those editorial lieutenants – and at least a dozen others in the Journal – could easily have permanently filled Steiger’s oversized shoes if they had been loaded with them.

Steiger’s most significant influence on 9/11 occurred long before that day, recruiting, promoting and setting an example for his deputies.

Harris: Veteran Times Editor-in-Chief Howell Raines and newly-appointed Editor-in-Chief Gerald Boyd were instrumental in redirecting nearly all of New York’s staff to cover the World Trade Center disaster. They freed up immense space in the next day’s newspaper and in the editions of the following days, and scheduled additional editor meetings each day to allow coverage to expand quickly, with superior planning.

A whole new regime had to be put in place to cover the “catastrophe” of September 11 which did not exist the day before. What types of covers had to be created on the fly? And what did the staff at The Times and The Journal learn from having to make this adjustment?

Harris: At The Times, a huge success has been his extraordinary design and execution of a whole new way of writing about victims. Thousands of people were missing in the attacks on the Twin Towers, in a form of devastation that made it impossible to identify the bodies. Thus, the vital task of producing obituaries has become quite chaotic.

This pressure on The Times resulted in a special section called “Portraits of Mourning”. The approach, specifically cited as part of “A Nation Challenged” – the special daily section noted in his quote from Public Service Pulitzer – evolved from a plan by editor Christine Kay. She devised a system in which journalists prepared 200-word mini-profiles of people missing as a result of the disaster. The profiles avoided the normal “death notice” information, instead choosing a characteristic of the person that set them apart.

Beyond concentrating related information in one place for readers, Editor Boyd noted that the daily meetings on what belonged to the section inspired an increased level of staff input. “I’ve always been amazed how, on any given day, someone I never thought of would have a brilliant idea,” Boyd said. “There really was a belief that people could be heard.”

Rotbart: The Journal starting September 12 was a different journal than it had been on September 11, and it never reverted to its old self.

More importantly, for decades the Journal’s three front-page articles (left column, middle column, and right column) were thought-provoking, analytical, and other in-depth or original articles. But they did not contain breaking news. A column on the left on a Monday could just as easily be released the following Friday, or even a few weeks later, without appearing dated.

But breaking news became a staple of the Journal’s front page starting Wednesday, September 12, with an increased focus on politics, foreign policy and national security throughout the newspaper.


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Justified, says journalist detained for sedition after writing CM Vijay Rupani will go http://tahaoglu.net/justified-says-journalist-detained-for-sedition-after-writing-cm-vijay-rupani-will-go/ Sun, 12 Sep 2021 01:39:55 +0000 http://tahaoglu.net/justified-says-journalist-detained-for-sedition-after-writing-cm-vijay-rupani-will-go/ In May 2020, in the midst of the first wave of Covid-19, Dhaval Patel, editor-in-chief of the Gujarati news web portal Face of Nation, wrote an article about a possible change of leadership in Gujarat. Patel was slapped for sedition and spent 14 days in judicial custody before being released on bail. On Saturday, Patel, […]]]>

In May 2020, in the midst of the first wave of Covid-19, Dhaval Patel, editor-in-chief of the Gujarati news web portal Face of Nation, wrote an article about a possible change of leadership in Gujarat. Patel was slapped for sedition and spent 14 days in judicial custody before being released on bail. On Saturday, Patel, who left India after the cancellation of the FIR, called the resignation of Rupani a “justification” for what he had reported.

While the article was withdrawn shortly after publication, the FIR was quashed in November last year, only after Patel issued an “unconditional apology” to the Gujarat High Court. While canceling the FIR, filed by a police sub-inspector, the court warned Patel that “as he publishes an article in the future, no such comments will be used against constitutional officials. without verification and he will make sure not to repeat the same “.

Patel told the Sunday Express on Saturday that he moved overseas in December 2020. Of his unconditional apologies, he said: “It was obvious the state wanted to drag the case and I didn’t want it. same thing because it was supposed to affect my career, so the government lawyer proposed that I apologize and left the country.

Rupani has tendered his resignation to Governor Acharya Devvrat. (Photo: CMO)

On his story, Patel said, “I have reported based on confirmation from reliable sources and cross-checking of the same. The sedition case was also a way to put pressure on journalists given the Covid-19 context at the time. Patel continues to write for Face of Nation, and his last article was on September 4.

The article regarding Rupani’s replacement was written by him on May 7, 2020 and was titled ‘Mansoukh Mandaviya called by the high command, the chances of change of leadership in Gujarat ‘. Mandaviya, an MP for the Rajya Sabha of Gujarat, was at the time Union Minister of State for Navigation (Independent Office) and Chemicals and Fertilizers. (In the recent reshuffle he was promoted to Union Minister of Health).

The complainant was Deputy Inspector SJ Desai, assigned to the Ahmedabad Crime Detection Directorate (DCB). Patel was booked by DCB under section 124A of the IPC (sedition) and section 54 of the Disaster Management Act (for false warning) on ​​May 11, 2020, and charged with ” tried to create unrest in society “. He was arrested on May 14 and the court released him on bail on May 27.

According to Patel’s report, the BJP was considering a change of guard due to criticism from the Rupani government of the increase in Covid-19 cases, which were viewed by the high command as “mismanagement of affairs by the military apparatus. ‘State “. He said Mandaviya called by the high command in Delhi signaled that he could be Rupani’s replacement, and added that there were several instances of BJP suddenly changing to CM without anyone knowing.

The article was withdrawn after Mandaviya denied this and praised Rupani for leading a “successful” fight against Covid-19. The news portal carried Mandaviya’s denial.

In granting Patel bail on May 27, the Ahmedabad Magistrates’ Court observed that the prosecution’s record on its face did not indicate a serious offense as alleged by the state.

A senior police official told the Sunday Express on Saturday that Patel’s arrest was based on a complaint filed by the police themselves after an investigation. “There has been no complaint filed by a politician. “

In its complaint, SI Desai quoted the article, saying it had circulated on various social media platforms and that the “rumors … (have) caused an atmosphere of fear and instability among the population”.

“The brief content of the article is that Corona cases are increasing in Gujarat. The chief minister failed to deal with the pandemic and his knowledge was taken by New Delhi. In this regard, Mansukh Mandaviya was called to Delhi by the high command because he enjoys the image of a trusted lieutenant of the Prime Minister. For this reason, speculation about a power reshuffle is on the rise. The PM and the high command are not satisfied with Rupani’s work, because of which, in such places where the cases of Covid are increasing, the high command has introduced an army of IAS officers… The officers of the ‘IAS have been given all kinds of freedoms… informed the sources. Usually, in these cases, the BJP high command does not let go of a whiff and the final decision is usually shocking. Even in Anandiben’s time, no one had any information that Ben was going to leave and all of a sudden she posted her resignation on Facebook, ”the complaint said, citing the article.


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Journalist discovers untold 9/11 accounts from New York students http://tahaoglu.net/journalist-discovers-untold-9-11-accounts-from-new-york-students/ Thu, 09 Sep 2021 05:41:22 +0000 http://tahaoglu.net/journalist-discovers-untold-9-11-accounts-from-new-york-students/ Journalist finds untold 9/11 testimonies from New York students A freelance journalist who traveled to New York months after the 9/11 attacks publishes previously unseen interviews with teenagers who were near Ground Zero. A freelance journalist who visited New York six months after the September 11 terrorist attacks is posting previously unseen interviews with high […]]]>

A freelance journalist who visited New York six months after the September 11 terrorist attacks is posting previously unseen interviews with high school students near Ground Zero.

Joseph Fenity traveled to New York in the aftermath of the attacks for an independent documentary that aired in 2002. Fenity will now broadcast the additional audio-only interviews with students on Saturday, marking 20 years after the attacks.

He said he found the old tapes going through his storage locker.

“I have several tapes from old projects but suddenly I found these New York tapes from 2002 and it took me back to when I went to New York six months after 9/11 and I interviewed these students from this high school [Stuyvesant High School] so I immediately saw these tapes and thought I had to convert them and put them out digitally, ”he said.

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Fenity talks about what it was like talking to students and seeing the city after the attacks.

“It was all still very nervous, and everywhere you could see an American flag draped over it. I just remember talking to these kids and the strength and resilience these kids displayed was just amazing and truly inspiring. Stuyvesant. is a school that’s about three blocks from the World Trade Centers, the Twin Towers once stood, so these high school kids, ages 15-16, were kind of eyewitnesses to history, so this that many of us saw on our televisions at home, they saw their classroom window so that they had some really interesting and compelling first-hand accounts of how this history day turned out. unfolded for them, ”he said.

The interviews had a video, but it removes the video element for the audience.

“What I took out was the video and so now only audio is available and I did that because that’s what I want them to remember with them. I think the visuals September 11th can be distracting. I think it’s etched in our memory anyway. We’ve seen it before but we haven’t heard September 11. We haven’t heard those voices, “Fenity said. .

Fenity shared clips of some of the audio recordings with FOX 11 ahead of the podcast’s launch.

A student recounted the dark day.

“At first we were like ‘Oh my God a bomb went off’ and then it looked so big and someone said he heard a plane. The first thing that happened to me was the mind was not oops its an accident because it looked like a direct hit. They didn’t think the second tower would fall on us, but they thought that when it was going to fall it would send such a shock wave that Stuyvesant would collapse on herself, ”the student said.

Another student recalled the evacuation procedure.

“They locked us up at the school, then they organized us to be evacuated to the north side. They told us to walk north. I don’t know if they had planned this in an emergency,” he said. he declared.

Fenity said there are several student interviews that will be shared on Saturday.

“To listen to young people talk about how they can go through something like that, I think that inspires us all. We’ve been through a lot in the last 20 years, the last two years and I think watching young people and hearing from them can be truly inspiring and healing. What we’re doing by reposting this on 911tapes.org is giving them a voice in a way they’ve never had before, ”Fenity said.

The additional tapes will air Saturday at www.911tapes.org and via SoundCloud.


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How reader comments bond back then http://tahaoglu.net/how-reader-comments-bond-back-then/ Sat, 04 Sep 2021 21:35:23 +0000 http://tahaoglu.net/how-reader-comments-bond-back-then/ Times Insider explains who we are and what we do, and provides behind-the-scenes information on how our journalism comes together. In a recent interview with late night TV host James Corden, singer-songwriter Lorde described how a voluntary social media hiatus prompted her to find company in a popular New York Times commentary section. “The first […]]]>

Times Insider explains who we are and what we do, and provides behind-the-scenes information on how our journalism comes together.

In a recent interview with late night TV host James Corden, singer-songwriter Lorde described how a voluntary social media hiatus prompted her to find company in a popular New York Times commentary section.

“The first time I wasn’t on social media I was so cranky, I felt so disconnected,” she said. But now his social network is the NYT kitchen application. “I go on and look at the comments,” she added. “It has become a source of community for me.”

Helping readers find that sense of connection is part of my job. As the Times Community Manager, overseeing the team that moderates reader comments on nytimes.com, I look for ways to strengthen our relationship with readers. Our team highlights reader responses to stories when we can, and gives Times reporters insight into how their work can meet the needs and interests of our readers.

The best part of my job is seeing our journalism reach out to readers on a personal level, inspiring them to share their perspectives. Their daily experiences add valuable context and clarity to our reports.

For example, in Claire Cain Miller’s article on how the pandemic created a child care crisis that disproportionately affected mothers, we asked them to tell us their story of leaving the workforce. or reduce their staff. The responses were deeply moving.

“I had to cut back on my hours to help my daughters overcome the overwhelming challenges of distance education. I feel like the last decade of struggle and progress has been derailed, and the professional goals I once set for myself are not worth pursuing until my kids are out of the house. . It’s like building armor after being heartbroken, ”wrote Alexis Lohse of St. Paul, Minn.

Part of our mission at The Times is to help people understand the world. Our commentators help us achieve this goal. Comments are one of the most used features of the Times website and app, and over 80% are written by subscribers. Almost one in 10 subscribers read the comments every week.

Some of our best comment sections are delicious and surprising. Remember Jerry Seinfeld’s Opinion essay refuting a claim that New York City was “forever dead” from the coronavirus? One of the best things about the play was the comments. A veteran cab driver who wrote as Old Yeller wrote about his favorite moments at work.

“My favorite type of ride is the rare one to pick up a man who has just been released from a hospital after the birth of his first child,” he wrote. “It’s the happiest day of his life and I usually have a hard time hiding my own tears of joy as he tells me everything.”

This response has gone viral on social media and has prompted hundreds of readers to share their own love letters to New York City and the painful times that put their bonds to the test.

Reader feedback also plays an important role in the development of our reports. In a recent article on the closure of US borders with European countries, dozens of commentators lamented separation from loved ones, unsure of when they will be reunited. “I am fully vaccinated and from the UK I haven’t seen my US partner for 18 months,” wrote Millie from London. Another commentator, Kevin from Germany wrote about his partner: “She is vaccinated. I am vaccinated. What more can we do? I just want to finally give her a hug.

The outpouring forced our reporter Nicholas Casey to write a follow-up article highlighting how the ban has, for some European families, compounded one of the pandemic’s deepest heartaches – the separation itself.

Our comment sections provide an outlet to engage in debate and discussion in a fully moderated space, and provide readers with the opportunity to hear from others who have unique experiences related to the article.

Last year, a dentist wrote that he had seen a slight increase in the number of people with cracked teeth. The comments section was both revealing and painful, filled with readers who identified themselves as dentists and patients sharing anecdotes and solutions for grinding teeth.

“These are some of the best recommendations for dealing with Covid stress that I have read anywhere,” wrote one reader.

One of the first steps in building a strong and engaged community is to recognize their contributions and amplify the voice of readers.

Shortly after Andrew M. Cuomo resigned as governor of New York, commentators were quick to unbox his dramatic downfall. The reactions have been mixed. Some spoke of the need for more women in positions of power, while others saw her downfall as a step towards empowering powerful men. Others praised his tenure, especially during the devastating first wave of the pandemic in New York City.

I asked a handful of reviewers for permission to highlight their words on our homepage and worked with our designers to make the comments visible. Highlighting some of these personal reactions completed our reporting and compelled other readers to join the conversation.

So what’s next for our community experience?

We will continue to focus on integrating feedback into the heart of the reading experience and finding opportunities to invite diverse perspectives. It helps us to develop lasting relationships with our readers.

And we will continue to look for ways to involve our reporters more in the comment sections. You may even hear from a reporter interested in following up with you.

In the meantime, we would love to hear from you in the comments. Tell us what you like and what we can improve.

And to those who are already contributing to these valuable discussions through the site, thank you for building our communities and improving our journalism.


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Two years of MAVERICK CITIZEN – Journalism with Purpo … http://tahaoglu.net/two-years-of-maverick-citizen-journalism-with-purpo/ Thu, 02 Sep 2021 08:25:47 +0000 http://tahaoglu.net/two-years-of-maverick-citizen-journalism-with-purpo/ Today, Maverick Citizen marks its second year of “Journalism with a Purpose” and what a dazzling year it has been! Our VISION: To facilitate and write about solutions that offer the promise of creating a better and fairer life for people – those who live in South Africa and those affected by what our country […]]]>

Today, Maverick Citizen marks its second year of “Journalism with a Purpose” and what a dazzling year it has been!

Our VISION: To facilitate and write about solutions that offer the promise of creating a better and fairer life for people – those who live in South Africa and those affected by what our country does or doesn’t do. Maverick citizen focuses on social justice, promoting the creation of a society of equals – doing so with empathy, compassion and kindness. We report and underline the importance of active citizenship and are regarded as a reliable source of information and opinions on, among others, education, health, human rights and social issues. We are first and foremost journalists who use our professional tools to highlight different perspectives, educate, dispel apathy while providing high quality and relevant information related to the constitutional ideals of non-racism, non-sexism, dignity and equality.

Our MISSION: Shine a light on the marginalized, discover new voices, stimulate new thinking and debate, and be a space for excellent social justice journalism. A journalism service that reveals and defends the truth and demands accountability from those in power. We strive to keep the promise of our Constitution, a topical story, an investigation, an insightful opinion piece, an inspiring visual and an area of ​​special interest all at the same time.

As stated in our vision and mission, which we have refined over the past two years, Maverick citizen has always sought to highlight underreported issues within civil society and highlight stories that often don’t get the platform they deserve.

It is ordinary South Africans who do their best to live in a country that seems to make them invisible, which we seek to put forward in order to fulfill our country’s constitutional promise. Like the story of the homeless Alberts farm fighting for their right to dignity, or the widows of Aloe Community helping each other to survive drug shortages, or the rural children’s center which is take care of orphans forgotten by the Department of Social Development, the death and death in the Eastern Cape health system, how residents drug and gang colonies in Cape Town are fighting, or how the inhabitants of Amadiba help each other to survive thanks to their own agricultural initiatives.

Over the past year, the Covid-19 has dominated Maverick citizenand as such, we have particularly focused on the pandemic, building on the team’s wealth of health reports and networks. It even earned us recognition at the African Digital Media Awards 2021 for being the best trusted initiative, which we are quite proud of.

We also hoisted the flag thanks to great partners such as Projector, Bhekisisa, Mukurukuru Media, Viewfinder, GroundUp and wonderful independents.

We reported on everything from bi-monthly press briefings with the National Coronavirus Command Council, to how ordinary and poor people on the ground were affected and how provincial health systems were creaking under the weight of the virus. We have also established an authoritative presence on all things Covid by launching webinars with health experts on what Covid-19 is and answering people’s questions about the pandemic, allowing them direct access to information. indispensable.

Our other area of ​​health focus has been the Eastern Cape and our collapsing health system who was crippled by the impact of Covid-19. From staffing shortages in hospitals and the unavailability of beds when patients need to be admitted, to growing medico-legal lawsuits, the province is at a breaking point. Emergency medical services remain inaccessible to the most vulnerable who need them most, and frequent drug outages continue to plague the province.

While article 27 of our Constitution says that “everyone has the right to have access to health servicesincluding reproductive health services and no one can be denied emergency medical treatment ”, it appears our government has chosen to ignore this right when hospitals have to operate with gutted roofs, no water and no electricity, putting the lives of staff and patients at risk.

We have also shone the spotlight on the issue of Food justice, an area that receives little attention but has had a big impact on the survival of millions of South Africans. According to our Constitution, “everyone has the right to enough food and water”, yet there are 11.8 million South Africans reported as living on a hunger crisis level.

Part of the fight for food justice is creating food literacy so people are able to make informed decisions about what they eat and why they eat it. The food and beverage industry is riddled with misconduct and flout the regulations, and the public has the right to be informed.

Areas of food sovereignty in particular often cause stunted growth and malnutrition, all of which are part of the current food crisis exacerbated by Covid-19. As a publication that focuses on issues of social justice, tackling hunger is essential as it is created by the effects of an unequal and unjust society.

We have included our mission and vision so that our readers and contributors can hold us accountable for the principles contained therein, to ensure that our journalism remains of the highest quality.

We look forward to another landmark year of Maverick citizen and will continue to work to bring social justice issues to the fore. SM / MC

Zukiswa Pikoli is a journalist at Maverick citizen.



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Man accused of murdering journalist escapes Pune custody http://tahaoglu.net/man-accused-of-murdering-journalist-escapes-pune-custody/ Sun, 29 Aug 2021 05:52:04 +0000 http://tahaoglu.net/man-accused-of-murdering-journalist-escapes-pune-custody/ A 42-year-old man accused of kidnapping and murdering an RTI activist and journalist in the town of Rahuri fled from a government hospital in Ahmednagar on Saturday evening, as he was transferred to Pune for treatment. kidney stones after testing positive for Covid. The man has been identified as Kanhu Gangaram More, a real estate […]]]>

A 42-year-old man accused of kidnapping and murdering an RTI activist and journalist in the town of Rahuri fled from a government hospital in Ahmednagar on Saturday evening, as he was transferred to Pune for treatment. kidney stones after testing positive for Covid.

The man has been identified as Kanhu Gangaram More, a real estate agent from Rahuri Town, Ahmednagar District. More was arrested by police in connection with the kidnapping and murder of 48-year-old journalist and RTI activist Rohidas Datir in the first week of April. After being kidnapped, Datir’s body was found in an isolated location on the premises of a college in Rahuri.

The initial investigation revealed that Datir had an ongoing dispute with More, over a property. Shortly after the brutal murder of Dtir, who worked for a weekly magazine, police arrested More. On August 16, More was admitted to a public hospital in Ahmednagar for treatment of his kidney stones.

“While being treated for kidney stones, more recently tested positive for Covid-19 and was transferred to Pune on Saturday for further treatment. At around 5 p.m., as an ambulance was getting ready for him, he told police guards on duty that he wanted to use the toilet and would have run away. An immediate search of the premises and the surrounding area was launched once it was discovered that he was missing, but he could not be found. Ahmednagar police officer said.

A massive manhunt has been launched for More with several teams being part of the search effort, police officials said.

After his disappearance, Datir’s wife, Savita, filed a kidnapping complaint with the Rahuri Police Station, after which the police launched an investigation. Examination of videos captured by some of the CCTV cameras in the area showed that an SUV used by the accused to kidnap Datir belonged to More. Subsequently, More and his accomplices were arrested. According to the complaint filed by his wife, Dtir had received threats and had even been assaulted before his kidnapping and murder.


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Mexico hosts more than 100 Afghan journalists fleeing Taliban http://tahaoglu.net/mexico-hosts-more-than-100-afghan-journalists-fleeing-taliban/ Wed, 25 Aug 2021 21:05:35 +0000 http://tahaoglu.net/mexico-hosts-more-than-100-afghan-journalists-fleeing-taliban/ By Karol Suarez and Ivana Kottasová, CNN Over 100 Afghan journalists and their families arrived in Mexico on Wednesday after requesting humanitarian protection, according to a statement from the Mexican Foreign Ministry. The group of 124 people believed to have been in danger in Afghanistan consisted of media workers and their families, including children, the […]]]>

By Karol Suarez and Ivana Kottasová, CNN

Over 100 Afghan journalists and their families arrived in Mexico on Wednesday after requesting humanitarian protection, according to a statement from the Mexican Foreign Ministry.

The group of 124 people believed to have been in danger in Afghanistan consisted of media workers and their families, including children, the statement said. They arrived at Mexico City International Airport early Wednesday.

Mexican Foreign Minister Marcelo Ebrard said the decision to offer protection to journalists was “congruent with Mexico’s historic position.”

“These are those who risk their lives to inform and communicate; who are committed to freedom of expression, ”he said, adding that the group included journalists and local staff from“ many media outlets who have requested humanitarian visas in Mexico due to the latest events ”.

The Foreign Ministry added in the statement that travel and living expenses during their stay in Mexico will be covered by private sponsors and civil society organizations.

The Committee to Protect Journalists has warned that Afghan journalists face extreme dangers amid the Taliban takeover.

At least three Afghan women journalists have been murdered this year, according to Reporters Without Borders (RSF), while one was shot dead by an armed man in December 2020.

The New York Times said on Wednesday that a group of Afghans who worked for the newspaper, along with their families, were among the group.

According to a statement released by the Mexican Foreign Ministry, the director of International News for the New York Times, Michael Slackman, thanked Mexico for its support and “the rapid dispatch by the Mexican government of safe means of transport for the journalists”.

In the statement, Slackman also urged “the entire international community to follow suit and continue to work on behalf of the brave Afghan journalists who remain at risk.”

RSF said the Taliban was already placing severe constraints on the media, even as it made promises to protect press freedom.

“Officially, the new Afghan authorities have not issued any regulations, but the media and reporters are treated arbitrarily,” RSF secretary general Christophe Deloire said in a statement.

The group said at least ten journalists were victims of violence or threats while working on the streets of Kabul and Jalalabad last week.

Many Western media present in Afghanistan have evacuated their foreign correspondents and local staff in recent weeks, following the Taliban takeover.

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New program launched to help Indigenous journalists build careers in industry http://tahaoglu.net/new-program-launched-to-help-indigenous-journalists-build-careers-in-industry/ Wed, 25 Aug 2021 11:03:53 +0000 http://tahaoglu.net/new-program-launched-to-help-indigenous-journalists-build-careers-in-industry/

Media producer Jolene Banning hopes the new Indigenous Reporters Network will help attract more First Nations people to journalism so their voices are the ones that tell the stories of their people. – Photo of Leigh Nunan

By Colin Graf

TORONTO – Two Canadian organizations are launching a new program to bring together Indigenous journalists to develop their skills, participate in professional development and make new connections with their peers across the country.

The Canadian Association of Journalists (ACJ) and Journalists for Human Rights (JDH) created the Indigenous Reporters Network help First Nations journalists and editors at all stages of their careers network and make connections.

“We are creating an institutionalized set of opportunities for Indigenous journalists to network with each other and with mainstream Canadian journalists,” said Rachel Pulfer, Executive Director of JDH.

The Indigenous Reporters Network will bring together Indigenous journalists, emerging and established, to create online and offline communities within the CAJ.

“There is a shortage of Indigenous journalists in the industry, and this initiative creates an opportunity for emerging journalists to launch careers, or for established Indigenous journalists to hone their skills,” said Karyn Pugliese, former chair of the CAJ. “Having more Indigenous journalists in the industry will be critical to achieving the media’s reconciliation goals. “

“In 2015, Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) laid bare the essential role the media must play in advancing our country’s long-term reconciliation goals,” said the president of the ACJ, Brent Jolly. “The creation of the Indigenous Reporters Network brings us one step closer to achieving these goals, as it will help increase access to jobs, professional development opportunities and leadership positions for Indigenous journalists.

Since 2013, JHR operates the Indigenous Journalists Program increase the quality and quantity of Indigenous stories and voices in Canadian media. The program trained 2,500 people, including Indigenous journalists, non-Indigenous journalists learning best practices for covering Indigenous stories, and Indigenous adults and youth interested in journalism. The program provided professional training, financial support, supervised internships and scholarships to indigenous youth or “people in transition to journalism,” says Pulfer.

As the original program continues, the director of JHR said the new network will “integrate Indigenous journalists into a professional network of over 900 members” within CAJ, Canada’s national body for the profession.

Through join the new program, interested young people and working journalists will have their CAJ membership fees covered for two years. They will also have access to professional development events as well as networking opportunities that will allow aspiring reporters to get started and help create more avenues of advancement for those already working in the field, says Pulfer.

JHR’s original journalists’ program was “absolutely a huge help to a lot of people,” says Tanya Talaga, the award-winning Fort William First Nation journalist and author who shed light on the deaths of students in the First Nations secondary school in Thunder. Bay as a reporter with the Toronto Star.

“Our young people are full of stories they have waited too long to tell.”

The program has helped remove systemic barriers to education and the lack of opportunities, she said.

“JHR has helped break down those barriers and open doors in newsrooms as well. “

Although Jolene Banning, a producer at Talaga’s media production company Makwa Creative, has yet to join the new network, she credits JHR’s original program for making her debut in journalism ago. a few years.

“It has been incredible support to help me get my foot in the door,” with learning opportunities, connections and mentorship, she says. Mentors in the Native Reporters Program have been ‘amazing’ to ‘meet people where they are’, visit communities that can be reached by air in the north ‘where they don’t even have a high school’ to talk about journalism and helping people with the media projects they wanted to do, whether it was podcasts, newspapers, or connecting with mainstream media, Banning recalls.

Eventually, the program arrived in her Fort William First Nation community, and she learned to present a story to editors and interpret editorial commentary. Banning later worked for a major Canadian media outlet where she worked as an administrative assistant with an on-air column.

“We’re really starting to hear now what is needed is leadership training so that they (Indigenous journalists) can move forward,” Pulfer says.

He was told they were frustrated at being “vetted as an indigenous journalist, covering indigenous stuff” or not being framed in a role where they could take a leadership position.

The need to promote Indigenous voices in Canadian media is immediate, according to Banning and others.

“Stories that ignore our history, the truth about what happened, are often quite harmful and hurtful,” she says.

Indigenous peoples are still often portrayed in the media as “drunk, murdered or missing, or dancing,” she said.

“That’s roughly it. These institutions must make room for us,” she adds.

The lack of Indigenous people in reporting first hit Pulfer in 2012, as the Idle No More movement gained momentum. Neither those who reported the stories nor the interviewees appeared to be indigenous.

She was puzzled, so Journalists for Human Rights conducted a study of Canadian media content from 2010 to 2013 that “confirmed the anecdotal feeling that indigenous peoples are just completely absent from these stories.”

This study led to the first Indigenous Reporters Program. Pulfer repeats the oft-quoted saying that “journalists write the first draft of history”, so “what better place to start than to encourage and support Indigenous journalists to ensure their views and understanding of this story ”are recorded.

The need for these changes is now accelerating following the discovery of numerous anonymous graves at former residential school sites, she adds.

“It finally convinces Canadians that there is a real problem here that has been cleared of our textbooks.”

Funding for the Indigenous Reporters Network is provided through the RBC Foundation’s Future Launch program.


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Journalist’s Desperate Attempt to Save Translator from Taliban Killing http://tahaoglu.net/journalists-desperate-attempt-to-save-translator-from-taliban-killing/ Mon, 23 Aug 2021 21:21:00 +0000 http://tahaoglu.net/journalists-desperate-attempt-to-save-translator-from-taliban-killing/ Every morning since the Taliban took control of Afghanistan following the US withdrawal, journalist Toby Harnden has been waiting for a call or WhatsApp message from “R”, a translator he worked with “First victim: the untold story of the secret CIA mission to avenge 9/11– his new book on the early days of the 2001 […]]]>

Every morning since the Taliban took control of Afghanistan following the US withdrawal, journalist Toby Harnden has been waiting for a call or WhatsApp message from “R”, a translator he worked with “First victim: the untold story of the secret CIA mission to avenge 9/11– his new book on the early days of the 2001 US invasion.

“It’s a proof of life check,” Harnden told the Post. “Part of my fear is that he will fall and I won’t hear from him anymore because God knows what happened. It is constant tension.

Harnden – who worked for The Telegraph and The Sunday Times – has now written two books on Afghanistan and has spent a lot of time in the war-torn country. While many of his associates fled to Turkey and Uzbekistan, R contacted him last weekend, desperately seeking help.

Journalist Toby Harnden tried to get his translator “R” out of Afghanistan.
Rahmat Gul / AP

“He said, ‘I’m in Kabul and I need to get out,’” Harnden said.

A British-born American citizen based in Northern Virginia, Harnden applied for a Special Immigrant Visa (SIV) for Afghans, but received only an automated response. He does not have a file number for R.

“As far as I know, his case has not even been reviewed. Right now it’s like he’s at the DMV and standing in line while waiting [a] number to call… In the meantime, you have this desperate emergency, ”Harnden said.

The frustrated freelance journalist took to Twitter on Sunday, highlighting The heartbreaking situation of R to flee his homeland.

“If he is left behind, the Taliban will kill him,” he wrote.

Every day, R, 29, risks his life by going to Kabul airport. He carries photos of the couple and a visa application, hoping to approach an American soldier so Harnden can vouch for him over the phone. R saw people being trampled to death and his own foot opened in the crowd.

Harnden shared the gruesome image of R’s injury on social media.

Every day, R, 29, risks his life by going to Kabul airport. He carries photos of the couple and a visa application, hoping to approach an American soldier so Harnden can vouch for him over the phone.
Toby Harnden / Twitter

“He had his foot sewn up and said everything was fine,” Harnden said. “These people are tough. He was about 9 years old when the Taliban were overthrown and ousted in 2001. He lived through the Taliban and the civil war, so we had our feet chopped off [is nothing in comparison]. ”

But just carrying the papers is a dangerous act.

“The terror falls into the hands of the Taliban and has your own death warrant in your pocket,” Harnden said.

Harnden first met R in the northern city of Mazar-i-Sharif, while he was researching for his book, which will be released on September 7.

“He had a journalist mentality, which a lot of translators don’t have,” Harnden said, noting that R had tracked down two doctors who were critical sources for his book.

“I’ve been trying for weeks to get these guys and he just finds them right. He is a well educated young Afghan who learned his English through cinema. He’s the kind of guy, if he comes to America, he’s going to be successful. He will bring something.

Taliban fighters pose for a photo in Kabul, Afghanistan.
R continues to report for Harden, updating him with images and videos of the situation in Afghanistan.
PA

Even though he faces death, R has regularly updated Harnden, including uploading a video of the Taliban burning down an amusement park. “He always pays and we trade leads. Biden promised to get everyone out. It is a great promise and I hope he will keep it.

But Harnden leaves nothing to chance.

Since sharing R’s heartbreaking story, he has been contacted by many people with private organizations trying to facilitate evacuations out of the chaotic danger zone.

“It’s a depressing time, but there has been goodwill towards the Afghans and it’s encouraging. I have given his contact details to a lot of people, but he is only one of thousands and time is running out, ”said Harnden, who remains confident he will soon be able to welcome his friend to our safe shores.

“I hope I can meet him in Dulles or any airport in the United States. He is a survivor and he will make the most of this opportunity.



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